Sunday, April 26, 2015

Jared Genser writes Washington Post Article about National Press Club Presentation on Thursday



Washington Post carried an Op Ed piece by Jared Genser prior to his Newsmaker at the National Press Club with Lalia Ali and Amal Clooney
http://www.press.org/…/imprisoned-former-maldives-president…
Preventing Atrocities Now — And in the Future

Preventing Atrocities Now — And in the Future

By Jared Genser

Three years ago, President Obama created the Atrocities Prevention Board to help fulfill his important recognition that the prevention of mass atrocities is a “core national security interest and core moral responsibility.” With ethnic conflict boiling in Burma , South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo , among other places, such a mechanism has never been more important. Although the board’s operations have been classified, there have been some visible successes. But much remains to be done.

The board is run out of the National Security Council and is composed of senior policymakers from across the government who meet to discuss conflicts with the potential to generate mass atrocities. It is a major step forward that senior officials are regularly discussing atrocity prevention and that these discussions are now informed by a national intelligence estimate on the risk that atrocities could occur. This new approach has enabled better coordination and more rapid responses across government agencies.

In one vivid illustration, the Obama administration reacted swiftly in late 2013 to help stem sectarian and political violence in a fast-deteriorating situation in the Central African Republic, providing millions of dollars for aid and peacekeeping operations as well as a national radio broadcast from Obama urging peace. This critical intervention helped turn the country back from the precipice of disaster. In addition, the board has been credited with producing a rapid U.S. response last summer after the Islamic State drove tens of thousands of Iraqi Yazidis from their homes. And it has spurred the creation of a major prevention program in Burundi in the run-up to its presidential election in June.


In a recent speech at the Council on Foreign Relations, Undersecretary of State Sarah Sewall explained the complexity of atrocity prevention and how it requires using a broad array of “diplomatic, political, financial, intelligence and law enforcement capabilities to prevent these crimes before they evolve into large-scale civilian atrocities.”

Although there has been strong criticism of the administration’s failures in Syriaincluding by me, the board is focused on lower-profile prevention and not such highly visible problems where the U.S. government is already heavily engaged. In the case of the Central African Republic, for example, senior officials credited the rapid mobilization of resources and support on their familiarity with the country after months of being briefed on the potential threat of escalation. 

Still, while important progress has been made, further action must be taken. 

First, Obama should issue an executive order to govern the board’s operations, explain how it goes about its work and assign specific responsibilities to various agencies. This is not a partisan issue, and future presidents should have every reason to retain the board. This order was expected years ago, and the delay in making this structure permanent undermines the president’s goals and creates uncertainty about the board’s future.

Second, Obama and Congress should work together to create an Atrocities Prevention Fund, with an appropriation of at least $50 million in the first year. Prevention can be a hard sell, as success is often measured in things that don’t happen. But the government’s ability to respond rapidly to evolving situations is highly limited by resource constraints. The creation of such a fund, with appropriate congressional oversight of how the money is spent, would help institutionalize atrocity prevention activities in the government and focus attention on designing the right responses. While the United States is only one country and it relies on support from many partners in this work, ongoing U.S. leadership is indispensable, and these funds can be used to leverage support from other donors.

Finally, the board must provide greater transparency in its operations and elevate the visibility of its work. While certain aspects of its operations need to remain classified, there is no reason a declassified version of the board’s annual report to the president could not be released. Greater engagement with Congress, civil society and the public at large will also help the board build a stronger and broader base of support to sustain its critical work in the years to come.

Today, the international community has both the experience to predict and the capacity to prevent mass atrocities before they spin out of control. Obama has recognized the centrality of atrocity prevention to our values and our national security. Now, in his remaining time as president, he should take action to ensure that the Atrocities Prevention Board becomes one of his most enduring legacies.

Jared Genser is an associate of the Carr Center for Human Rights Poli


Jared Genser writes about Maldives imprisonment of Maldives President for Washington before NPC Newsmaker on Thursday





Washington Post carried an Op Ed piece by Jared Genser prior to his Newsmaker at the National Press Club with Lalia Ali and Amal Clooney
http://www.press.org/…/imprisoned-former-maldives-president…
Preventing Atrocities Now — And in the Future

Preventing Atrocities Now — And in the Future

By Jared Genser

Three years ago, President Obama created the Atrocities Prevention Board to help fulfill his important recognition that the prevention of mass atrocities is a “core national security interest and core moral responsibility.” With ethnic conflict boiling in Burma , South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo , among other places, such a mechanism has never been more important. Although the board’s operations have been classified, there have been some visible successes. But much remains to be done.

The board is run out of the National Security Council and is composed of senior policymakers from across the government who meet to discuss conflicts with the potential to generate mass atrocities. It is a major step forward that senior officials are regularly discussing atrocity prevention and that these discussions are now informed by a national intelligence estimate on the risk that atrocities could occur. This new approach has enabled better coordination and more rapid responses across government agencies.

In one vivid illustration, the Obama administration reacted swiftly in late 2013 to help stem sectarian and political violence in a fast-deteriorating situation in the Central African Republic, providing millions of dollars for aid and peacekeeping operations as well as a national radio broadcast from Obama urging peace. This critical intervention helped turn the country back from the precipice of disaster. In addition, the board has been credited with producing a rapid U.S. response last summer after the Islamic State drove tens of thousands of Iraqi Yazidis from their homes. And it has spurred the creation of a major prevention program in Burundi in the run-up to its presidential election in June.


In a recent speech at the Council on Foreign Relations, Undersecretary of State Sarah Sewall explained the complexity of atrocity prevention and how it requires using a broad array of “diplomatic, political, financial, intelligence and law enforcement capabilities to prevent these crimes before they evolve into large-scale civilian atrocities.”

Although there has been strong criticism of the administration’s failures in Syriaincluding by me, the board is focused on lower-profile prevention and not such highly visible problems where the U.S. government is already heavily engaged. In the case of the Central African Republic, for example, senior officials credited the rapid mobilization of resources and support on their familiarity with the country after months of being briefed on the potential threat of escalation. 

Still, while important progress has been made, further action must be taken. 

First, Obama should issue an executive order to govern the board’s operations, explain how it goes about its work and assign specific responsibilities to various agencies. This is not a partisan issue, and future presidents should have every reason to retain the board. This order was expected years ago, and the delay in making this structure permanent undermines the president’s goals and creates uncertainty about the board’s future.

Second, Obama and Congress should work together to create an Atrocities Prevention Fund, with an appropriation of at least $50 million in the first year. Prevention can be a hard sell, as success is often measured in things that don’t happen. But the government’s ability to respond rapidly to evolving situations is highly limited by resource constraints. The creation of such a fund, with appropriate congressional oversight of how the money is spent, would help institutionalize atrocity prevention activities in the government and focus attention on designing the right responses. While the United States is only one country and it relies on support from many partners in this work, ongoing U.S. leadership is indispensable, and these funds can be used to leverage support from other donors.

Finally, the board must provide greater transparency in its operations and elevate the visibility of its work. While certain aspects of its operations need to remain classified, there is no reason a declassified version of the board’s annual report to the president could not be released. Greater engagement with Congress, civil society and the public at large will also help the board build a stronger and broader base of support to sustain its critical work in the years to come.

Today, the international community has both the experience to predict and the capacity to prevent mass atrocities before they spin out of control. Obama has recognized the centrality of atrocity prevention to our values and our national security. Now, in his remaining time as president, he should take action to ensure that the Atrocities Prevention Board becomes one of his most enduring legacies.

Jared Genser is an associate of the Carr Center for Human Rights Poli

Friday, April 24, 2015

Postcards

Postcards for my summer production of The Springfield Boys  just arrived from the printer. . Look great!

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Laila Ali, Wife of Imprisoned Former President, to Appear With International Lawyers Amal Clooney and Jared Genser

Fighting for Freedom: Calling for the Release of Imprisoned Former Maldives President Nasheed Mohamed

April 30, 2015 10:00 AM
Location: Murrow Room



Laila Ali, Wife of Imprisoned Former President, to Appear With International Lawyers Amal Clooney and Jared Genser

Washington, DC – Laila Ali, wife of imprisoned former President of the Maldives Mohamed Nasheed, will speak at a National Press Club Newsmakers news conference on Thursday, April 30, and make public a filing that day to the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention urging it to find that Nasheed is being held in violation of international law.

After many years as a dissident journalist, prisoner of conscience, and democracy activist, Mohamed Nasheed became the first democratically-elected President of the Maldives in 2008.  As President, Nasheed used his position to strengthen democratic institutions in the Maldives, and as a platform to advocate for increased awareness of and action against global warming. He made global headlines by staging an underwater cabinet meeting, to highlight his low-lying country’s vulnerability to rising sea levels. He also set an example by outlining policy to make the Maldives carbon-neutral, transitioning from oil to solar power. His environmental efforts were chronicled in the acclaimed documentary The Island President.  He was forced to resign in 2012, under the threat of personal violence against him in a coup d’etat.  Despite winning a plurality of the vote in the country’s 2013 elections, the Supreme Court annulled the results, returning to power the same family which had ruled the Maldives for decades.

Nasheed was convicted and sentenced to 13 years in prison on “terrorism” charges in March, stemming from the alleged wrongful detention of a judge by the Maldivian military while he was president.  Amnesty International condemned the “sham trial,” and said the verdict was a “travesty of justice.”

A small island nation in the Indian Ocean most known for tourism, the Maldives also holds great strategic economic and military importance because it straddles international shipping lanes.  The country has traditionally been a key ally of India, but the current government has a strong relationship with China. China is reportedly seeking to build a naval base there to counterbalance India’s control of the Indian Ocean and the U.S. military presence in Diego Garcia.  Nasheed, who attended university in the United Kingdom, is a lifelong advocate for freedom, democracy and human rights.

Examining the case with Ali will be her international lawyers Amal Clooney and Jared Genser.

This NPC Newsmakers news conference is scheduled for Thursday, April 30 at 10 a.m. in the club’s Murrow Room, on the 13th Floor of the National Press Building, 529 14th St. NW, Washington DC 20045.

Like all Newsmaker events, this news conference is open to credentialed press and NPC club members, free of charge. No advance registration is required. The news conference will also

Contact: Tony Gallo NPC Newsmakers Event Host  202 -544-6973, agallo2368@verizon.net
 

Royalties

A pleasant surprise.   I write my plays(now 16) to be produced.  But these plays are also published by Browns Court Publishing Company.  I  never expected much in the way of royalties.  Well low and behold I have been getting royalties virtually every month for the past year.  Very tiny but steady.  http://Amazon.aegallo.com

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Spring is beautiful.

Gardens of my Capitol Hill Home








Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Eisenhower cancellation

The Eisenhower Memorial Commission Newsmaker at the National Press Club for April 23 has been cancelled. 

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Maldives, Clooney and Genser

Will be hosting wife of imprisoned Maldives former President with her lawyers Amal Clooney(yes!) and Jared Genser on April 30 at the National Press Club on Thursday April 30 at the National Press Club.

Saturday, April 18, 2015

General Reddel at National Press Club

Come to The National Press Club to hear General Carl Reddel, executive director of the Eisenhower Memorial Commission discuss progress to date on Thursday, April 23 . Read more  http://www.press.org/news-multimedia/news/expert-panel-discuss-future-eisenhower-memorial-april-23

Friday, April 17, 2015

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

BRINGING IKE HOME: WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE NATIONAL EISENHOWER MEMORIAL

TOPIC:          BRINGING IKE HOME: WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE
NATIONAL EISENHOWER MEMORIAL

Newsmaker Panel:

·         Brigadier General Carl Reddel, USAF (Ret.), Executive Director, Eisenhower Memorial Commission
·         Victoria Tigwell, Deputy Executive Director, Eisenhower Memorial Commission
·         Daniel J. Feil, Executive, Eisenhower Memorial Commission

Frank Gehry’s design for the National Eisenhower Memorial has been the subject of criticism and controversy and has been attacked by classical design proponents.  Yet late last year the design received preliminary approvals from both of the federal agencies charged with reviewing and approving the design. 

What is the true story behind building Ike’s memorial?

Learn how a national memorial honoring one of America’s greatest military and political leaders -- and designed by one of the preeminent architects of the 21st Century -- has remained on track and is moving toward completion.

How has the design evolved? What is its’ current status?  What’s next for the National Eisenhower Memorial?

This NPC Newsmakers news conference is scheduled for Thursday, April 23, at 10 a.m. in the Zenger Room , on the 13th Floor of the National Press Building, 529 14th St. NW, Washington DC 20045.
Like all Newsmaker events, this news conference is open to credentialed press and NPC club members, free of charge. No advance registration is required.
Contact:
Tony Gallo NPC Newsmakers Event Host202 -544-6973, agallo2368@verizon.net


Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The audience really enjoyed our performance of Paul at the Ingleside Stage on Rock Creek last night.


Sunday, April 12, 2015

Antarctica Side Show

Susan take great trips of our Antarctica Cruise. View  Go there

Friday, April 10, 2015

Streetcars

Planning a National Press Club Newsmaker for May on:   Streetcars In America:   Or Are We Better Off With Buses?

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Eisenhower newsmaker

Will be hosting Newsmaker at the National Press Cub on progress on the Eisenhower Memorial in DC. General Carl W. Reddel .executive director Memorial Commission will be on the program

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Paul at Ingleside Stage

You are invited to see Paul at Ingleside on Rock Creek Stage on Monday. See video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ9PGPfmao8.  Read more:http://cu.aegallo.com

Monday, April 6, 2015

Easter Video

Quick video of fun at Chesapeake Bay on Easter Sunday 2015.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTP0vE4KqQg

Elephant Island Antarctica

Video of our trip to Elephant Island in Antarctica. 
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=CWxRF8_-L-4

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Easter 2015

We had a delightful Easter dinner at the home of my son Thomas and his girl friend.  The view of the Chesapeake Bay was gorgeous and the 50 mile ride to this house was pleasant.


Saturday, April 4, 2015

Paul at Ingleside

See Paul at Ingleside at Rock Creek Stage. http://cu.aegallo.com
Ingleside at Rock Creek Park  and the Seventh Street Playhouse
PAUL
By
Anthony E. Gallo
Monday, April 13, 2015      8:00PM
3050 Military Road, NW | Washington, DC 20015 
This play examines the complex and contradictory life of Christianity’s second leading theological architect.  Paul’s impact not only on the now two billion Christians around the world but tangentially on non-Christians as well is not disputed. The play follows him from being a deeply religious Jewish leader, successful businessman, civic leader, and persecutor of fringe cults to becoming an apostle of the Nazarean following his epiphany on the road to Damascus. The narrative traces his conflicts with members of the new cult, then with his fellow disciples, the Romans, Greeks, Jewish leaders, his own family and friends, and the people he tries to convince. It asks if Paul’s spiritual conversion also resulted in personal character conversion.  :
Cast:
Rachel                   Bunty Ketcham  
Paul                        James McDaniel
Peter                       Julian Ball
Barnabus              Tim Wolf
Johnmark              Grant Bagley
James                     Ronnie Hardcastle
Thomas                 Ben Robles       
 Mark                     Pat Martin
High Priest             Tim Wolf
Ananias                 Beatrix Whitehall
First  Woman        Bunty Ketcham
Second Woman   Margaret Bagley
First Man               Ronnie Hardcastle
Second Man         Pat Martin            
Executioner          Grant Bagley    
Voice                     Ben Robles
Miriam                   Margaret Bagley
Narrator                 Beatrix Whitehall
Sound Design       Beatrix Whitehall


Questions and Reservations  :  Agallo2368@verion.net  202 544 6973  No charge or donation